« Another Lost Opportunity For Radio | Main | Remembering Rivers »

February 27, 2012

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d834c9d85969e201630151a258970d

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Should You Heed The Signs Of Change?:

Comments

Greta32Hutchinson

Some time before, I needed to buy a house for my organization but I did not earn enough cash and could not order anything. Thank God my mother adviced to take the personal loans at banks. Thence, I acted that and was happy with my commercial loan.

EDWARD TODD

I think Pandora is the NEW and BIG deal. Period the end. Im out of radio after 25 years and sad by the demise of something once very cool…its a freaking disaster because of folks like Lew Dickey who has encouraged repeater radio and NON local radio.

Someone will write a book or create a documentary and it will be Lew Dickey that will one day be pointed at as the reason radio became obsolete…we had our chance to be ULTRA local and allow local programmers to create outstanding radio content instead a few jerks with power destroyed it.

Nike Free Run

Mind you the description sounds interesting, in a "driving past an road accident scene" kind of way.

Greg Smith (HDRadioFarce)

"Putting all that backing behind HD Radio at the expense of learning how technology was evolving around you is about to take its toll. Radio won't die, but it will never regain its full balance."

Ken is absolutely correct. I can't wait to see what toll HD Radio takes. Soon, hugh? How the entire radio industry, Congress, the FCC, and the automakers allowed themselves to be duped by Struble is amazing. Struble must be brillant. Radio was doing fairly-well until Struble came along with his massive fraud and distraction.

Ken Dardis

In the early 80s, I would go to meetings with David Saperstein and try to get GMs and owners to run traffic reports on the radio. Many would not/could not see how a traffic report belonged on a music station.

In 1990 I was on the management team that put the nation's 4th sports talk radio station on the air. Many music and talk radio GMs and GSMs laughed at the format - who was going to listen to an all-sports station?

In 1997 I began writing about how the internet would affect radio; and have called many times for GMs and PDs to be more aware of the drift that's occurring, due to the "accountability" factor. All that we've heard since was "we're radio, and we do local better than anyone."

For everyone in radio, if you are not looking/listening to how new media is affecting youth - and even elders, in many cases - you will certainly be surprised in five years time.

Putting all that backing behind HD Radio at the expense of learning how technology was evolving around you is about to take its toll. Radio won't die, but it will never regain its full balance.

For those who believe that producing quality local programming is the answer, even that may be a little late -http://www.audiographics.com/agd/010312-1.htm

Changing to meet today's advertiser and audience needs is the only option left, with finding people who understand how to make that change happen being a vital next step. (Hint: They are not the same folks you've seen year-after-year on panels at radio industry conventions.)

Duane Christensen

I can only comment right now on my own experience. I'm 37 and listen to my ipod approx 30% of the time, radio 60%, and Pandora maybe 10% just so I can be exposed to songs that might not make the cut on radio. my favorite kind of music isnt available locally on the radio. But it IS for the majority of listeners. Keep the DJs live and learn how to make commercials that don't annoy the heck out of people and radio will remain strong longer than we think.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Become a Fan

Subscribe